Tag: Resilience

C

Cybersecurity lessons for 2020 and beyond

Good cybersecurity has tremendous potential to improve society, business and services we use every day. Because of its very nature, though, it involves discussion of bad actors and defensive measures, which can easily skew public perception. Indeed, big breaches seem to be occurring more and more frequently, and the bad guys are always in the headlines, making it all the more important to pause and take stock of the situation. In October, international stakeholders from academia, industry and government gathered in Japan for the third annual Cyber3 Conference Tokyo 2017. The two-day event was held at Keio University in conjunction

9

9 Factors To Ensure Your Cybersecurity Policy Works For Your Staff, Not Against Them

Companies and organizations are still struggling to deal with ransomware, a cyberattack in which user data is encrypted and held hostage, supposedly until a ransom is paid. This trend looks set to continue and perhaps even intensify. I often get asked by executive management about what they should be doing and what questions they need to be asking. Those questions can be a useful guide for those who aren’t sure if they’re doing enough beyond asking the IT department to take care of it. Instead of the usual spiel about what equipment to purchase or what software to install, I

W

What nature teaches us about managing risk

In the last few weeks, I’ve attended more than my usual number of international cybersecurity conferences, and the perspective, scope and dimensions of the discussion have evolved quite a bit in the last few years. I’ve been speaking with people from different backgrounds on this topic at events hosted by the United Nations to discuss the counterterrorism angle, by NATO for its use of the military and warfare, by Interpol for the balance between law enforcement needs and public privacy, and even by the OECD for the asymmetries that developed countries face in protecting themselves. This has allowed me to

9

9 ways to stay safe from cyberattacks

“April is the cruelest month,” T.S. Eliot wrote, but if he were alive today and working in cybersecurity he might have chosen May. This month saw a ransomware cyberattack that was startling in its scale, affecting hundreds of thousands of computers around the world in networks ranging from railways to hospitals, causing treatment delays for patients in the UK. While the WannaCry attack was entirely preventable, it can offer several lessons about prevention and resilience that bear repeating. The price of complacency This latest strain of ransomware takes advantage of a vulnerability in Windows that, according to Microsoft, uses software

W

What Y2K And 9/11 Could Have Taught Us About Managing The WannaCry Cyber Attack

Over the past week, countless organizations around the world were victims of a cyberattack involving WannaCry ransomware. While the EU’s law enforcement agency called the attack “unprecedented,” it was perhaps only unique in scale. In fact, this attack was neither sophisticated nor innovative. It had many precedents and was definitely preventable. For starters, according to numerous security analysts, WannaCry took advantage of a file-sharing vulnerability in Windows that was repurposed using commonly available “Ransomware-as-a-Service” to package the attack and allow it to support multiple languages simultaneously. To make matters worse, Microsoft had actually released a patch for these vulnerabilities in

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!