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Hackable medical devices and other security threats of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Last year, researchers told the DerbyCon security conference that thousands of medical devices such as X-ray machines, MRI scanners and infusion pumps for medication were vulnerable to hacking. Inexcusably, many organizations still used the default passwords provided by manufacturers and a number were connected to the internet, posing not only a health risk to patients, but also a means to compromise personal information. These are just some of the risks associated with the internet of things (IoT), the movement to plug everything from cars to refrigerators into the internet. IoT is one of many tech buzzwords on people’s lips now.

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What the G7 must do for internet growth and security

In 2014, researchers from the World Economic Forum and McKinsey & Company projected that as much as $21 trillion in global economic value creation would depend on the robustness of cyber-security over five to seven years. That’s as big as the entire U.S. economy. To discuss the future of the Internet and its risks, IT ministers from the G7 countries and the EU gathered for the first time in 20 years. The information and communications technology (ICT) summit in Takamatsu, Japan, was held against a background of major cyber-security dangers including threats to critical infrastructure and mobile devices as well

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Mitsubishi’s Long-Lived Success Points to Weakness in Japan’s Economy

Author: Eric Pfanner and Atsuko Fukase Originally posted: The Wall Street Journal TOKYO—They’re building Japan’s tallest skyscraper, manufacturing its first commercial jetliner and trying to sell stealth submarines to Australia for some $38 billion. The companies of the Mitsubishi group are capitalizing on the big projects that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hopes will restore national pride. The prominence of the nearly 150-year-old group points to the stability of Japan’s corporate titans and their ability to steer through wars, financial crises and technological change. At the same time, the concentration of capital and talent in a single set of companies underscores

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Foxconn’s Deal for Sharp Now in Question Taiwanese assembler of iPhones said it is delaying the signing of takeover agreement

Author: Eva Dou in Beijing, Wayne Ma in Hong Kong and Takashi Mochizuki in Tokyo Originally posted: The Wall Street Journal Board members of struggling Japanese electronics maker Sharp Corp. met Thursday and agreed to sell the company to Taiwan’s Foxconn Technology Group for almost $6 billion, a decision hailed as a symbol of a push by Japan’s government to open up the country’s notoriously insular industries. There was a snag. Foxconn, which assembles most of Apple Inc.’s iPhones, was having second thoughts. In a written statement released hours later, Foxconn said it would delay signing any deal because it

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IoT and Your Health

Having attended medical school, I understand that the Internet of Things (IoT) offers health-management solutions beyond the medical devices used to address problems faced by an aging society. My wife and I have a daughter who turned four last year. When she was born, I got the notion that it would be useful to attach various sensors to her crib to assist in her upbringing. At that time, IoT-related devices were not as obtainable as they are now, so I scrounged around Tokyo’s Akihabara district for sensors that I linked to a personal computer to devise a makeshift IoT crib.

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