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How Charles Lindbergh Can Save Japan (Part 1)

Reading the news these days, one cannot escape the sense that Japan is burdened with immense problems with no good solutions in sight. The clean-up of a highly toxic nuclear plant in Fukushima and the ongoing energy shortage it has exacerbated are only two of the most obvious. The government is talking about how many trillions of yen will be needed to respond to these problems, although any figure agreed to this year will surely turn out to be inadequate next year. Discussions of the inevitable tax increases have only begun; there will be more to come. What people don’t

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What cyber-security insiders discussed at Davos 2017

When global leaders met recently for the World Economic Forum’s annual summit in Davos, Switzerland, there was much talk regarding the threats to globalization from political changes in Western countries. But another kind of change that’s often closer to home is threats to our everyday lives and businesses from cyber-attacks, a hot topic in last year’s U.S. presidential election. Experts aired their concerns at the summit, and based on my observations, here’s what came up most often: Worries about increased hacking of political systems as well as enterprises and organizations. Issues of privacy, bullying and trolling as well as the

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How To Make 2017 The Year Of IoT Security

People who make Internet of Things (IoT) devices still aren’t getting the message on security. And as these devices proliferate, the danger of increased attacks is getting more real. Late last year, popular internet services such as Netflix and Twitter were temporarily taken down amid a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that involved hackers deploying malware to simple webcams that many of us use without thinking. Authorities in the U.S. and U.K. were investigating the Mirai malware used in the attack to create a botnet, an army of zombie devices commanded by hackers. In fact, the Mirai code is still

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What the communication revolution means for global leaders today

The theme of last year’s Davos, the Fourth Industrial Revolution, became the underlying force driving many of the unexpected developments we’ve seen in 2016. With the rapid and exponential growth of connectivity and networking predicted by Moore’s Law, the Fourth Industrial Revolution is disrupting many fields, but none more strikingly than democracy — and capitalism. Both institutions are based on the freedom to choose a leader, product or service based on the best available information. But only now are we realizing the significance of how this information is created, delivered, modified and consumed — how it has been skewed by the exponential growth in

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Sensors, Vulnerabilities, and Data Protections

Many of us find ourselves with multiple gadgets – in our pockets, our homes, our cars, our offices – and these gadgets are increasingly built to talk to each other, often automatically and invisibly. Camera phones upload straight to the Web and connect through WiFi and Bluetooth to unseen computer networks; the printer next to your desk can suddenly start printing out documents sent from a branch office on the other side of the world, and our cars automatically pull down information from the sky on the latest traffic and weather conditions. Even common documents (licenses, passports, payment cards) that

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